Get in touch

Interactive Bar

Log in
Google Search
Google Translate
Contact Us

Seascale Primary School

Aim High

Geography

At Seascale School we use the Oddizzi scheme to deliver our Geography Curriculum.

 

Here is a link to the website. 

https://www.oddizzi.com/

 

Here is the overview of the units that are covered.

 

Pathway 2 - Total Geography

Year group

Autumn

(Full Schemes)

Spring

(Full Schemes)

Summer

(Full Schemes)

Additional opportunities

1

Weather and climate* (fieldwork opportunity)

United Kingdom* (fieldwork opportunity)

Local area* (integrates fieldwork)

 

• fieldwork

(opportunities linked to Schemes are marked with an asterisk: selected activities from the Lower KS2 Local Area Scheme could be used at any point in Key Stage 2)

 

• topical opportunities •

 

 • use of maps •

 

• key geographical vocabulary •

 

2

Continents and oceans

Hot and cold places

Mugumareno Village, Zambia

3

Climate zones

North America (medium-term plan)

Rio and South-East Brazil

4

Rivers* (fieldwork opportunity)

Rainforests

South America – the Amazon (medium-term plan)

5

Mountains* (fieldwork opportunity)

Volcanoes and earthquakes (NB: this is a longer Scheme)

European region (medium-term plan)

6

United Kingdom* (fieldwork opportunity)

 

Local area and region - Upper KS2* (integrates fieldwork)

Year 1

By the end of Year 1, children should know:

  • basic vocabulary and concepts about weather and the climate;
  • the main nations and features of the UK, including their locations and related key vocabulary;
  • the location and features of the local area.

 

By the end of Year 1, children should be able to:

  • create a simple weather chart;
  • annotate a simple map of the UK with some of its key features;
  • look at simple maps and aerial views of the local area, discussing and asking questions about its main features and the way symbols have been used;
  • work together to create a simple map of the local area;
  • observe, record, discuss and ask questions about the main features of the local area, based on direct experience;
  • make connections between their investigation of the local area and what they have learned about weather, climate and the UK;
  • use appropriate vocabulary when describing local features and those of the UK, including for seasons and local weather.

 

In addition, children should have had opportunities to develop their locational and place knowledge, geographical vocabulary and skills of enquiry and map work through incidental opportunities within other subjects and via ‘geography in the news’.

 

Year 2

By the end of Year 2, children should know:

  • the names and locations of the world’s continents and oceans, and some information about each of them;
  • where the world’s main hot and cold regions are, and some information about what they are like;
  • the location and features of a contrasting locality in Zambia, comparing and contrasting it with their local area and situating it within the African continent;
  • how their location within hot and cold regions might affect everyday life differently in the UK and Zambia. 

 

By the end of Year 2, children should be able to:

  • use globes and atlases – and annotate maps – to identify continents and oceans, including the location of the UK, Europe, Zambia and Africa;
  • use globes and atlases – and annotate maps – to identify the world’s hot and cold regions, locating the UK and Zambia within them;
  • look at simple maps and aerial views of a contrasting locality in Zambia, discussing and asking questions about its main features and comparing these with the UK;
  • use appropriate vocabulary for continents and oceans, for hot and cold regions and when describing and comparing a contrasting locality in Zambia with their local area;
  • make use of the four main compass points when describing the location of these key locations and regions.
  •  

NB: The activities on a Zambian village could be adapted for a different non-European locality, country and continent.

 

In addition, children should have had the opportunity to develop their locational and place knowledge, geographical vocabulary and skills of enquiry and fieldwork (including the use of data and map work), and to make regular use of globes and atlases, through incidental opportunities within other subjects, via ‘geography in the news’ and/or through dedicated fieldwork days.

 

Year 3

By the end of Year 3, children should know:

  • where the world’s main climate zones are (building on their prior understanding of hot and cold regions);
  • the location and main human and physical features of North and South America;
  • the location and human/physical features of Rio de Janeiro and South-East Brazil, as a region in The Americas, comparing and contrasting this region with places previously studied;
  • how their location within different climate zones might affect everyday life differently in South-East Brazil and places previously studied;
  • the location of South-East Brazil and Rio de Janeiro within the South American continent;
  • about processes of settlement, trade, tourism and culture in South-East Brazil and Rio de Janeiro.

 

By the end of Year 3, children should be able to:

  • use globes and atlases to identify climate zones and consider their impact on different parts of the Americas, including South-East Brazil;
  • use globes, atlases and maps to identify the main human and physical features of North and South America;
  • interpret maps and aerial views of the Americas, South-East Brazil and Rio de Janeiro at a variety of scales, discussing and asking questions about their main features, and comparing these with places previously studied;
  • use appropriate vocabulary when describing the Americas, South-East Brazil and Rio de Janeiro and comparing them with other places; when describing climate zones and human processes; and when describing place locations and map features (e.g. the Equator, the tropics, the world’s hemispheres).

 

NB: The North America plans could be adapted or redesigned (e.g. around a road trip) and the final lesson could be based on a city other than New York.

 

In addition, children should have had the opportunity to further develop their locational and place knowledge, geographical vocabulary and skills of enquiry and fieldwork (including the use of data and map work), and to make regular use of globes and atlases, through incidental opportunities within other subjects, via ‘geography in the news’ and/or through dedicated fieldwork days.

 

 

 

 

Year 4

By the end of Year 4, children should know:

  • the key elements and features of a river;
  • the key elements of the water cycle;
  • the names of – and key information on – the world’s main rivers;
  • basic ideas about flood management;
  • the key elements of a rainforest biome, how these contrast with other biomes and the main location of the world’s rainforests (including the Congo);
  • the location and principal features of the Amazon, situating it within the globe and the South American continent and comparing and contrasting it with South-East Brazil;
  • how physical processes involving rivers, the water cycle and rainforests distinctively apply to the Amazon;
  • how some human beings have adapted to life in the rainforest and the Amazon.

 

By the end of Year 4, children should be able to:

  • interpret and explain key information on rivers;
  • evaluate a range of possible flood prevention measures;
  • use globes, atlases and maps to locate the world’s principal rivers, rainforests (and other biomes), including the Amazon;
  • interpret a range of maps and aerial views of the Amazon and apply this information to their understanding of it;
  • use appropriate vocabulary when describing the Amazon; rainforest and other biomes; rivers and river features; and place locations.

 

In addition, children should have had the opportunity to further develop their locational and place knowledge, geographical vocabulary and skills of enquiry and fieldwork (including the use of data and map work), and to make regular use of globes and atlases, through incidental opportunities within other subjects, via ‘geography in the news’ and/or through dedicated fieldwork days. For example, fieldwork in the autumn term observing and recording the features of a local river or waterway would strongly support learning that term, while subsequently feeding into work on the Amazon in the summer.

 

Year 5

 

By the end of Year 5, children should know:

  • the names and locations of the world’s principal mountains, volcanoes and areas at risk from earthquakes;
  • the main features and types of mountains;
  • how some people have adapted to life in mountainous areas;
  • the main features and causes of volcanoes and earthquakes;
  • the location and principal features of the region around Athens, when seen at a range of scales, from the global to the immediately local;
  • ways in which human processes (such as tourism and migration) operate within the Mediterranean, Greece and Athens;
  • ways in which the location and physical geography of the region impact on (and are impacted by) human activity – this includes the key role of the Mediterranean Sea, as well as core knowledge about mountains, volcanoes, earthquakes, etc;
  • how people can respond to a natural disaster, such as an earthquake;
  • ways in which the location and distinctive features of Greece and the Athens region (including everyday life) compare and contrast with those of other places studied;
  • about place-specific patterns of continuity and change (including different perspectives on issues in the news, as well as ways in which modern-day Greece compares and contrasts with its past).

 

By the end of Year 5, children should be able to:

  • interpret a range of maps and aerial views of Athens, Greece and the Mediterranean region and apply this information to their understanding of it (e.g. when arguing the case for tourism in the Mediterranean);
  • look critically at a topical issue in this region, raising questions about it, considering the reliability of sources and exploring and evaluating a range of viewpoints;
  • use globes and atlases to identify the location of Greece and the Mediterranean;
  • use and apply appropriate vocabulary when describing the location and distinctive features of mountains, volcanoes, earthquakes, the Mediterranean, Greece and Athens.

 

NB: The study of a European region could conclude by looking at Rome or another city, region and country, rather than Athens and Greece.

 

In addition, children should have had the opportunity to further develop their locational and place knowledge, geographical vocabulary and skills of enquiry (and to make regular use of globes and atlases), through incidental opportunities within other subjects, via ‘geography in the news’ and/or through dedicated fieldwork days.

 

Year 6

 

By the end of Year 6, children should know:

  • the location and principal features of the UK and their local region when seen at a range of scales, from the global to the immediately local;
  • ways in which human processes (such as economic and political processes, the distribution of energy, land use, settlement and change) operate within the UK and their local region;
  • ways in which the location and physical geography of the UK and their local region impact on (and are impacted by) human activity in the region;
  • ways in which the location and distinctive features of the UK and their local region compare and contrast with those of other places studied.

 

By the end of Year 6, children should be able to:

  • interpret a range of maps of the UK and the local region and apply this information to their understanding of it;
  • use maps and supporting information to route-plan a tourist trip around the capital cities of the UK;
  • use fieldwork to collect and critically evaluate data from a range of viewpoints about the local region, how it meets people’s needs, and how it might change;
  • use and annotate Ordnance Survey maps, including the use of grid references, in order to present arguments about change in the local region;
  • use appropriate vocabulary when describing key information about the UK and the local region to external audiences.

 

In addition, children should have had the opportunity to further develop and secure their locational and place knowledge and geographical vocabulary.  They should have had the opportunity to further develop, use and apply their skills of enquiry and fieldwork (including the use of data and map work), and to do so with a greater degree of confidence and independence. They should have continued to make regular use of globes and atlases, including considering some of the key questions and choices involved in their construction and creation. This should have taken place through opportunities within other subjects, via ‘geography in the news’ and/or through additional dedicated fieldwork days that include a degree of independent investigation.

 

Top